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Январь 30, 2017 /
Распространение для эспрессо

Last week I sent out a survey with a single simple question:

How do you distribute for espresso?

Distribution is the act of evening out the coffee grinds in an espresso machine’s basket before tamping. This helps the water pass through all of the coffee grinds at the same speed and pressure, increasing the evenness of the extraction. More on that later.

I received nearly 3000 responses (from Barista Hustle subscribers only) and an incredible array of “other” answers. Baristas around the world are distributing with needles, toothpicks, credit cards, knives, cake spatulas (?), love taps (??), “new tools I made”, something called the “Chicago Drop”, Gwilym Davies, gift cards, Pallo cleaning tools, “my girlfriend” and many others. It was fun to read.

What’s more important is the majority and what they’re doing.

Here are the responses and their percentages:

Finger Swipe – 30%
Hand/Palm Grooming – 20.6%
Just tamp it as it comes – 14%
Stockfleth – 10.4%
Other – 7.9%
Dosing Tools – 5.9%

The vast majority of the “other” responses were either:

Vertical taps, “collapses” or “drops” on the grinder forks/bench – 2-3%
Tapping on the side of the portafilter with fingers or palm – 2-3%
Other stuff – 2-3%

Upon reflection I really should’ve included horizontal and vertical taps as an answer even though they’re only 3% or so. I believe some responders may have also chosen Hand/Palm Grooming option for tapping on the side. Thanks for taking the time to write your method in, and please excuse the omission.

I have rather strong opinions about distribution but – as with a lot of coffee techniques – I have never really tested it thoroughly. My method makes sense to me and feels consistent, yet still it looks like I might distribute differently to ~90% of you! This is both worrying and comforting.

So I set out to do some really intensive testing this week. I had designed an experiment and was half way through when I realised some inaccuracies were creeping in. I don’t want to publish bad data or mislead people when I know I can do better. I’m angling to have improved results ready within a week or two.

Instead, this week I want to explore the concept of distribution and create a framework for thinking about and evaluating it. I’ll also voice my opinions of the most popular methods. Hopefully I’m not too far off what the experiment will tell us!

There are a few metrics one needs to think about when finding an excellent distribution method. In order of importance, they are extraction, consistency, speed and cleanliness. Let’s go through them in that order.

Добыча

An excellent distribution method will enable an even extraction. The best thing about this is that there’s a ceiling. There is a maximum to the evenness provided by a distribution method (namely, perfectly even). So obviously, we should be chasing that maximum.

Note: distribution won’t improve the evenness of grind sizes, roasting, baskets etc. It will only improve itself: a noble goal regardless of the others. Everything helps!

The only way to really measure extraction effectiveness of a distribution method is to prepare identical shots with different distribution methods and A) taste the difference and/or B) measure the difference in extractions. When tasting, a superior distribution will produce the sweetest and strongest espresso. It may also present less extraction taints than the other. When measuring, a superior method will produce a higher strength and extraction.

Disclaimer: I’m not saying that stronger and highly extracted espressos are always better. I’m only saying that a better distribution will allow more of the coffee to be extracted, which produces an espresso with a higher strength and extraction.

Согласованность

An excellent distribution method will create many extractions that are very similar. Whether they are better or not is up to the previous section. For consistency, all I care about is, well, consistency. The best way to measure this is by pulling a large number of shots and measuring their strength and extraction. The tighter the grouping, the better the consistency.

Another factor of consistency is how well the method can be transferred to another Barista. If you and your team mate are individually consistent but different to each other than the method has failed. An excellent method is easy to teach, doesn’t suffer from human error too badly and is transferrable across a large number of Baristas.

Скорость

An excellent distribution method is fast. Really fast. If you’re making 500 coffees a day, the difference between spending 2 seconds and 5 seconds to distribute is 25 minutes!! It should also be part of a “flow” or progression from grinding to tamping. If you have to pick up extra tools, swap portafilter hands or make extraneous movements then the speed of the distribution will suffer.

That said, speed must sometimes be sacrificed to improve quality of extraction and consistency. As always, баланс and intelligent compromises are essential.

Чистота

An excellent distribution method keeps the Barista and Bar clean. If your skin touches coffee it will dry up and get dirty. This damages your skin, creates mess down the line (eg. dirty cups), slows you down to regularly clean your hands and creates a minor contamination hazard (coffee brewing is a пастеризация of sorts, but you can never be too careful). I am a strong advocate for never touching coffee with your hands or fingers: the advantages (extremely few) will never outweigh the disadvantages (many).

Tantamount to personal hygiene is that of the bar. Distribution shouldn’t create any mess. If it does you’re wasting coffee and decreasing accuracy of the amount of coffee in the basket. You’re also doing future you a disservice by making them clean up your mess.

Secondary Indicators

Here are some other less obvious ways to measure the effectiveness of a distribution method.

Where and when the espresso emerges from the basket with a голый портфильтр can tell you if there’s areas of lower density in the coffee grinds. This is obviously much less accurate than measuring extraction. If the espresso is emerging first from the edges then into the middle, your method has a central tendency which reduces flow in the middle of the basket. If there are patches that emerge first, then there is significantly less coffee in that region.

The last one that I thought up while designing this experiment is to measure density of the tamped coffee. To do this, one needs a dosing tool or piece of пластик/metal that scrapes out coffee grinds above a certain level in the basket. This would leave ~95% of the coffee grinds in the basket taking up a consistent volume of space in the basket. After distributing and tamping each basket, one could scrape the coffee grounds away, leaving a very consistent volume of grinds in the basket each time. If this consistent volume of space held differing weights of coffee grinds each time then the method is inconsistent.

Как они складываются?

So we have our four considerations for distribution effectiveness. Now let’s apply them to the most popular methods!

Some of these methods utilise vertical taps or “collapses” to varying degrees. That’s all well and good for vertical density of grounds, but the main issues like горизонтальное распределение are still holding them back.

Just Tamp It

The laziest and fastest of all the methods. Just tamp whatever the grinder gives you. Sure, you can move the handle around beneath a doserless grinder to improve distribution around the basket, but you’re being lazy.

The grounds might be a mound, they might be totally random, or you might be able to get a half-decent distribution from the way your grinder doses it up. Regardless, I’m of the opinion that you need to distribute no matter the delivery of the grinder.

What I already know is that this method has a fast speed and moderate cleanliness. In the experiment, I’m predicting the most uneven extractions and lowest consistency of them all.

Stockfleth

The Stockfleth uses your finger to spread the coffee around the top layer of the basket, discarding anything above a prescribed layer. Some baristas claim this method allows them to control the dose more accurately. I’m calling their bluff. Humans are not accurate or sensitive enough to perform this task to the required levels of consistency. We can’t sense the density of coffee beneath our finger without pressing on the coffee, which would defeat the purpose of sensing the density in the first place.

Second to my density argument, the Stockfleth method fails to distribute coffee to the lower edges of the basket. Because it only manipulates the top layer of coffee, Stockflething neglects the lower layers leading to uneven distribution of grounds. It may look like the coffee is evenly distributed, but it’s just a façade for the grinds beneath.

Waste can be minimised by sweeping excess grounds into a container or grinder doser for later use. This is rarely the case, especially with the prevalence of doserless grinders.

What I know already: Cleanliness and skin health are terrible. Potential wastage is high. It also takes way too long.

What I predict: mildly inconsistent and uneven extractions.

Of course, the Stockfleth is much more effective if you’re overfilling baskets and heavily under-extracting your espresso. The method relies on the basket being packed up to the brim with dense coffee grounds. Lower the dose to within the recommended range of a bigger basket (a la VST) and it falls over.

Finger Swipe

The Finger swipe is very similar to Stockflething. It’s inconsistent, unclean, and wasteful if you’re not reusing leftover grinds.
Also, Newsflash: the edge of your finger isn’t straight!

I’m predicting inconsistent and uneven extractions once again.

Hand/Palm Grooming

Some respondents may have chosen this answer for tapping the side of the portafilter with their hand. I’m evaluating this method later.

Grooming the coffee grinds with your hand or palm shares the problems of both the Stockfleth and Finger Swipe, with the added bonus of getting your palm dirty as well! It also – usually – moves more coffee to the centre of the basket rather than the edges.

Same predictions as above.

Dosing Tools

Depending on the tool, you can get mixed results. For best горизонтальное распределение you need dosing tools that operate below the rim of the basket (eg. the curved Scottie Callaghan tools) but they put less coffee in the middle of the basket and more at the edges, reducing evenness.

Tools can be fast and fairly consistent if you have developed a nice method. Keeping that consistent between members of staff is another matter.

Cleanliness and wastage is also minimal if you’re disciplined; though can be difficult when trying to push coffee right to the edges as some will inevitably fall out.

Other tools like knives and credit cards will give you a seemingly perfectly flat surface on top, but won’t help your distribution of grinds lower in the basket.

Same predictions again.

Tapping Vertically and Horizontally

I feel as though this is the best compromise between speed and quality. combined with a perfectionists cleanliness. The name says it all.

Horizontal taps will move the coffee right to the edges of the basket. That same motion will even out the distribution as denser areas will become stiff, allowing loose grinds to fill the rest. This motion affects the entire mass of coffee; not just the top layer a la Stockfleth.

Vertical taps on a solid surface will then remove any air pockets within the grinds. If there is any unevenness, you can easily see it because the grinds will sit at different heights across the basket. With that visual clue, you can revert to more horizontal taps to even it out.

This method is super clean, super fast and my personal favourite. I’m predicting (and hoping) that it’ll will win the experiment. It’s what I use every day, and a method that I’ve prescribed to many, many espresso bars around the world. I’m also totally happy to be proven wrong. This project is as much about learning for you as it is for me!

So there’s lots of things to think about when evaluating distribution methods. The more even, consistent, faster and cleaner, the better! I’m really looking forward to seeing some hard data to sort this issue out (at least temporarily). If I can’t execute the experiment properly before next weekend, I’ll be posting a thorough guide to how I distribute with the tapping method.

Write your predictions in the comments! I’ll be in there and active as per usual.

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Тони Айзекс
гость
Тони Айзекс

Great article. Look forward to hearing the results of the experiment. Will you be posting a guide for doser and doserless distribution?

Брайан Рэй
гость
Брайан Рэй

We have doserless, portafilter button activated grinders (Macap M7D). As the grounds are dropping into the basket I’m holding the portafilter handle with one hand and tapping the side of the portafilter with the tamper’s inlayed crown. Once it has finished grinding there is one swift tap on the counter to settle the grounds. This wastes no time as one hand is free anyway, and because I’ll be standing there for 3 seconds waiting for it to grind. This leads to very even distribution as the coffee is dropping and doesn’t compact the lower levels of the puck more than... Читать дальше

Макс Велдам
гость
Макс Велдам

Me and my fellow colleagues combine the vertical tapping, horizontal tapping and the finger swipe. We tap vertically while the grinds are dropping in the basket, this costs no extra time because you’re waiting here anyhow. Then we tap horizontally and finish it of with a finger swipe to completely even out the top layer. Besides it being unhygienic due to the finger swipe if feel this is the best (and rather fast) combined way. Any thoughts on combining such tactics and are you taking these in consideration while testing?

Новый бариста суетится онлайн, пока нет результатов тестов, что вы делаете для распространения? (Ссылка в посте) | MachineLovers.com
гость
Новый бариста суетится онлайн, пока нет результатов тестов, что вы делаете для распространения? (Ссылка в посте) | MachineLovers.com

[…] Here is the new barista hustle […]

рукав моря
гость
рукав моря

Question about the vertical and horizontal tap..

you say to keep tapping until it is level.. but the more you tap the more compact the coffee is becoming in the basket. and the number of taps (also the level of compactness of the coffee) will vary from shot to shot.
Could you try a set number of taps in your experiment? like 2 vertical and 3 horizontal?

maybe in a pattern like H-V-H-V-H? providing consistency both in the basket and from staff?

Киран
гость
Киран

Hey Matthew, if you are doing the experiment…. Could you add on details about the strength or weight applied during the tamp? I have often felt like that has been one of the major changes in the types of extractions we get between baristas.

Благодарю.

Джек О'Киф
гость
Джек О'Киф

What do you think about “fine migration” with taping?

Мартин Джеффри
гость
Мартин Джеффри

Do you think that the grinder you use ( ek 43 v conical ) effects the distribution techniique. Ive found that ek43 fine grinds sen alot more senstive to knocks and taps than other flat burr grinders ( when looming thro a naked pf ) ….

Максвелл Муни
гость
Максвелл Муни

I think you’ll definitely want to consider having a tasting panel in addition to measuring extractions with a refractometer. As you know, refractometers simply measure the overall percentage of extraction, not the evenness of the extraction. Since this experiment is set to measure the effectiveness of distribution techniques, which are intended to promote evenness of extraction, you’ll definitely need to taste and measure (A and B) not just one or the other. More work for you, unfortunately. It’ll also be important to have third party, blind assessors so that they may not accidentally color their responses. I definitely agree with... Читать дальше

Уоррен Миллс
гость
Уоррен Миллс

Thanks so much for mentioning this dirty habit that is putting your fingers in the grinds.
I’ve got rid of staff members that won’t change.
It just creates dirtiness through the whole flow.

Франциска Апро
гость
Франциска Апро

Я не мог согласиться больше!

Критик
гость
Критик

” I’m calling their bluff. Humans are not accurate or sensitive enough to perform this task to the required levels of consistency.” Speak for yourself. ” We can’t sense the density of coffee beneath our finger without pressing on the coffee, which would defeat the purpose of sensing the density in the first place.” The process of sensing/pressing allows a rapid feedback loop in which the data is gained, manipulated, and controlled for a consistent outcome. ” Grooming the coffee grinds with your hand or palm shares the problems of both the Stockfleth and Finger Swipe” It’s faster, i.e. <.5... Читать дальше

Гвилим Дэвис
гость
Гвилим Дэвис

Thank you for posting this Matt, I cannot agree with you more.

Мэтт Пергер
гость
Мэтт Пергер

So, I’ll pretend you’re one of the people here who uses their real name and is part of the community here instead of blocking your comment. Humans just aren’t that accurate. I’m sorry, but I’m not going to censor myself to comfort your ignorance. When the grounds are well compacted, a change in bed height of 0.2mm = a change of 0.25g of a normal density coffee. When un-compacted (ie. while stockflething or similar) the coffee is about half as dense. Let’s assume that your “feedback loop” is perfect, which is beyond generous. This means that your finger needs to... Читать дальше

Мэтт Пергер
гость
Мэтт Пергер

I’m with you for most of that, except that tamping only compacts the top 3/4. It’s most definitely compacting everything in there (unless you’re barely pressing).

Мэтт Пергер
гость
Мэтт Пергер

Thanks! Probably not doser though, sorry 🙁

Джимми Халим
гость
Джимми Халим

I trully agree with your distribution method. What I usually do is tapping vertical and horisontal then finger swipe to make it even.
But let say we all use robbur right now and we all know that robbur is not consistent. For example, when we dose 18g coffee, sometimes it came out 19 or 20g coffee. How you take some of the coffee out of it? Do use spoon or something else?

Thank you Matt.

Мэтт Пергер
гость
Мэтт Пергер

Maybe if you’ve got the portafilter on a vibrating table for 30 seconds. I find it quite hard to believe a couple of taps would make a meaningful change.

Мэтт Пергер
гость
Мэтт Пергер

I’ll be tamping until compacted and the grinds can’t move any more.

Мэтт Пергер
гость
Мэтт Пергер

Yeah EK needs a whole new distribution method. It’s very sensitive. I’ve got you though – It’ll be a post soon.

Мэтт Пергер
гость
Мэтт Пергер

Sometimes a set routine doesn’t quite make it flat and you need a few extra taps. I’ll be tapping until perfectly flat which is usually somewhere between 5 and 10. The grinds are still pretty loose.

Мэтт Пергер
гость
Мэтт Пергер

Yeah this is another thing was frustrated with on my first experiment. I’ll be using regular espresso grinders so it shouldn’t be tooooo different. (I hope)

bjeck14
гость
bjeck14

Based on the options presented, I tend to agree that the tapping method will be the most consistent, assuming that you are getting a consistent mass of coffee in the basket.
This does, of course, ignore the fact that particle distribution (grinder dependent) is going to affect your results. For example, a grinder with a wide particle distribution may fare poorly with the tapping method as smaller particles will migrate to the bottom of the basket, relative to large particles, which may affect extraction

Мэтт Пергер
гость
Мэтт Пергер

This is a big one. There’s lots of options here and something that needs a lot of time to explore. I usually use scales and adjust with a spoon though.

Мэтт Пергер
гость
Мэтт Пергер

Hey mate ( re twitter: definitely not sick of you 😉 )

I’m with you on most of that, however I think a refractometer will give us a statistically relevant result about evenness. The more even it is, the higher the extraction. I’ve already proven to myself beyond reasonable doubt that chasing a method that yields more extraction with the same parameters will be more delicious. Maybe I’ll start that level of detail when the Hustle has become a business rather than a hobby.

Маршал Ханс
гость
Маршал Ханс

I’ve been using a jam funnel with the EK as per your WBC routine. I like the ability to shake/swirl the mess out of the grounds (both before and after dumping them into the funnel) without throwing them everywhere. Clumps get broken up, and the bed gets nice and level before tamping. I have to imagine the distribution ends up quite even. I’m not sure about speed since I’m just tasting roasts vs. serving customers, although there are clearly cleanliness points and that saves time down the line for sure.

Джимми Халим
гость
Джимми Халим

I do scales them and i did adjust with a spoon last time and it slower than the finger swipe.
But its true. This is one of the thing that need to be explore.
Btw, thanks for the quick reply.

крепко спит
гость
крепко спит

My Mahl K30 dumps efficiently with some force, and if I tilt the PF a wee, I can hit dead center. The scoop handle (or any metal flat blade) tilted at a 45 degree angle, does the finish ‘Stockfleth’ and final sweep, for about as consistent btw, shots as possible in my experience. Yes, I waste a smidgen and it takes a few seconds, but I’m not doing 500 shots a day…only 4! 😉 Cheers Matt!

Лукас
гость
Лукас

I have to say regarding finger swiping/stockfleths that when it comes to doser grinders I struggle to find a more efficient way. With doserless grinders there is much more control over the amount of grinds. But having worked and trained mostly on doser grinders, even though I meticulously grind on demand, there is always that little bit extra you don’t want, especially with newbies. Just to verify, my current method with a doser is to vertical collapse (as similarly as humanly possible each time) early and into edges to ensure the bottom is compacted before stockfleths To finish. Your point... Читать дальше

Novan
гость
Novan

Dear Matt, Loving these articles so far. Learning a lot as someone who’s fairly new and green to the coffee game. I appreciate that you’re writing from the point of view of a barista who’s worked in the upper end of specialty coffee for some time and thus is working in an environment that encourages and caters to being able to implement vertical+horizontal tapping. Consequently I expect that baristas who work in similar environments will also benefit from this. I envision such an environment to have the system on complete lock – ideal hardware, ideal work space, ideal coffee volume:#... Читать дальше

Novan
гость
Novan

Hi Lucas, I was going to ask and raise a similar thing regarding manual/doser grinders and auto or doserless grinders.
I was wondering if you could give me a bit of insight as to how to better ensure that the bottom half of the basket is more even, using your method with a dosered grinder

Novan
гость
Novan

Sorry if this is question is super rookie, but a basic analysis on a naked PF of a well distributed dose in a basket is that espresso emerges from the across the whole bottom of the basket, evenly?

Лукас Мейсон
гость
Лукас Мейсон

Эй Мэтт,
loving the posts 🙂

The only problem I find with horizontal tapping is when you tap just a little too hard and find your grinds all up on one side of the basket… Especially when you’re busy. Isn’t it easier and faster to manipulate the PF during the dose to ensure the grinds are distributed evenly horizontally?
I’m not talking about “jiggling” the PF, big no-no for me, highly inconsistent, not to mention annoying to listen to all day!

Том Эрвин-Уорд
гость
Том Эрвин-Уорд

I am surprised that you find a tapping 5 to 10 times quicker or more accurate than Stockfleth. I have found that tapping methods tend to coax the coffee to the opposite side of the basket. We teach a two-pass reverse Stockfleth when working with an electronic dose grinder dosing an exact weight (give or take 0.2g) and an overdose and flat sweep method when using a dosing chamber. Collapses are only used to settle more coffee in the basket when a flat sweep is taking off too much coffee. These days as we advocate electronic dose grinders to minimize... Читать дальше

Брайан Рэй
гость
Брайан Рэй

Not sure if that link is posting or not, I can’t see it on my device. That excerpt is from “Tamping Science, Theory and Practice” on Coffeegeek.com circa 2006. You can test my theory easily. If your normal dose is 18 grams, for your first variable put all 18 grams in at once and perform your normal leveling and tamping technique (two vertical taps). For your second variable, put 6 grams in, perform two vertical taps, 6 more, two vertical taps, and the final 6 with two vertical taps, then tamp. For your third variable, put 9 grams in, perform... Читать дальше

Брайан Рэй
гость
Брайан Рэй

It is compacting everything, but not evenly… http://coffeegeek.com/opinions/coffeeatthemoment/10-07-2006 It’s an old article from an old school resource, but the science still holds true. “Thirty pounds of tamping pressure was kind of religious in espresso circles back in 2000. David Schomer, a pioneer in espresso crafting was touting that number in his books and his speaking engagements. In the newsgroup alt.coffee, the general consensus was that 30 pounds was the magic pressure for tamping (not all agreed with this though). So I was pretty surprised to hear that the Swift only tamped with 8 pounds of pressure. I asked why, and... Читать дальше

Гера Дэвидсон
гость
Гера Дэвидсон

Hi Matt, Looking forward to reading your findings. I’ve obsessed over distribution a lot in the past and performed a few experiments to find the best method for me so I an curious as to the inconsistencies you found in your first experiment and how you went about correcting them. In my experiments I found that any tapping, vertical or horizontal, actually reduced my extraction compared to finger swipe or Stockfleth. I would also get less even flow and side channeling with tapping more often than with Stockfleth (using a naked group handle), of course it could be my tapping... Читать дальше

Лукас Мейсон
гость
Лукас Мейсон

Hi Novan, I find with a doser grinder there are a couple of things to be aware of. Firstly, most doser grinders push coffee to the side with each pull. This automatically creates higher density on that side of the basket, so be sure you are watching and maneuver the PF to combat this. I also find the drop on doser grinders to be fairly wide, (I think because of the grinds being thrown across rather than dropping down). Be sure to dose small amounts and then vertically collapse (tap). Don’t fall into the trap of setting the doser to... Читать дальше

BlogParty
гость
BlogParty

Doesn’t the strada’s is pressure control allow you to do a soft inflation, limiting distribution faults?

BlogParty
гость
BlogParty

Привет Мэтт,

I have been told that collapsing, what I understand your vertical taps to be if slightly less vigorous, creates an uneven vertical distribution of the grounds. The bottom of the basket will contain more densely packed grounds moving to more loosely packed as you get to the top of the basket.

Мысли?

Митч Хейс
гость
Митч Хейс

We use, the weiss method combined with vertical collapses when using the EK for our espresso. Because we are running on a Strada which, given it’s fundamental design philosophy, likes to point out distribution errors. We have found this to be the most accurate method of distribution, ie, same brew time and beverage mass everytime. When using the Robur we colapse and tap and occasionally swipe – if the grinds are feeling recalcitrant. It’s not quite as consistent, but within +or- 2 g Bev. mass when running a profile. ASSUMING the dose mass is consistent. I know it’s different for... Читать дальше

Вито Муньос
гость
Вито Муньос

Good morning. I know my description of how I giggled and joggled must have been out there. As a picture is worth 1000 words, then then short video should be worth a million or so. 🙂 I have the compak grinder with timed trigger. I flick the switch once for single or twice for double. it doses ~19-21g and I do my jig. Light tap and use my espro calibrated tamper. without further ado.. The Dance…and the shot.

http://youtu.be/AbTPBKKVlI0

http://youtu.be/txFMsbbdPQY

Митч Хейс
гость
Митч Хейс

Yeah, that’s just the EP, the MP is completely manual. So your barista needs to pay even more attention to each shot. Not just recognising when the volume is more than usual.

All this being said. I would strongly recommend an EP. It will make you a better barista, or you’ll crumble under the pressure 😉 the only machine I would look at over a Strada is the Black Eagle gravimetric option (keep in mind I’m just sharing my opinions and I’ve never used a black eagle).

Doo it.

BlogParty
гость
BlogParty

Thanks Mitch, that’s something I’ll consider before taking the plunge. Is this only on the Ep or does it happen with Mp as well?

Митч Хейс
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Митч Хейс

Yeah it does, but because of the pressure feedback loop, via the pressure transducer reading live pressure. A small change in the resistance supplied by the coffee bed results in a lower pressure in the system than that of the reference, this makes the pump push harder to raise the pressure to that stipulated by the profile. This results in the water flowing through the area(s) of weakness in the bed with more ferocity – essentially turning small errors into bigger ones. Thus small distribution errors result in bigger discrepancies to bev. mass than might otherwise occur if the machine... Читать дальше

Андре Тхам
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Андре Тхам

Hi Matt, This is a great topic, and one which I’ve seen more attention paid to of late (Baader-Meinhof phenomenon?)! I was watching the ASCA Barista Championship finals two weekends ago, and noticed a few dosing practices from some of the competitors. Both Sasa Sestic and Hugh Kelly from Ona Coffee were both ‘pre-tamping’ (i.e. applying light pressure to) their grounds with custom acrylic tools. What was that about? Thoughts? I also observed you using a metal piece to ‘scrape’ your tamped bed of grounds. There was even an instance where you tamped, ‘scraped’, and then tossed out the unused... Читать дальше

Максвелл Муни
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Максвелл Муни

I’m not positive but I think there is a firmware mod to the EP that lets you fix that problem, if that helps at all.

Счастливая случайность
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Счастливая случайность

In regards to consistency of vertical and horizontal tapping, I’m wondering what other baristas thoughts are on the relationship between the number of taps and eveness. Is a greater number of taps likely to fill and space out more areas of the basket and that after each successive tap there is a smaller difference in grind distribution between areas of the basket. Is it also possible that after a certain minimum number of taps is surpassed the distribution difference becomes negligible? I feel this may have great applications for consistency as well as maximum eveneness as tapping past a certain... Читать дальше

Андрей Сток
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Андрей Сток

Something I’ve seen in competitions (and it may have already been mentioned here) is splitting the dose in half. Dose half the amount, vertically tap and then dose the rest finishing with vertical and horizontal taps.

Филипп
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Филипп

Is there a way to measure distribution without pulling a shot and introducing more variables? We know the goal: even distribution of grounds. We understand the implications of that. Is there a scientific technology/tool we can use to measure the density of the coffee bed in x different points on a grid immediately after the distribution technique is applied? Infrared? Optical? Glass portafilter? One of those things made of blunt nails that you stick your hand in and it makes an imprint of your hand? Some sort of computerized tamper with a billion sensors on the bottom that read the... Читать дальше

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